Monday, 30 March 2015

About Easter

Origin of the word Easter :

In most European languages, the word for Easter comes from the Hebrew Pesach.We can see the connection easily in French Pâques, Italian Pasqua, Spanish Pascua, Dutch Pasen, Danish Påske or Russian Paskha, for example. All of these words refer to the Jewish feast of Passover, which was the setting for the Easter events recounted in the Christian Gospels.

Why is it, then, that the English word for this feast is so different? Where does the word Easter come from?

According to various sources, the name Easter has its origin with a goddess of the Anglo-Saxons named Eostre (also Estre, Estara, Eastre, Ostara, and similar spellings in various sources). It is believed that she is the goddess of the dawn and was worshipped in the spring by pagans in Northern Europe and the British Isles.
In the UK Easter is one of the major Christian festivals of the year. It is full of customs, folklore and traditional food. However, Easter in Britain has its beginnings long before the arrival of Christianity.

In Britain Easter occurs at a different time each year. It is observed on the first Sunday after the first full moon following the first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere. This means that the festival can occur on any Sunday between March 22 and April 25. Not only is Easter the end of the winter it is also the end of Lent, traditionally a time of fasting in the Christian calendar. It is therefore often a time of fun and celebration.

What do people do?

People who regularly attend church often attend special services on Easter Sunday. These may be longer than on other Sundays. In churches, it is generally a festive occasion with an emphasis on the dawn of a new life.

Many people celebrate Easter Sunday by decorating, exchanging or searching for eggs. The eggs may be fresh or boiled eggs laid by chickens or other birds, chocolate eggs or eggs made of other materials. Many children believe that the Easter bunny or rabbit comes to their house or garden to hide eggs. They may search for these eggs or find that the Easter bunny has left them in an obvious place.


Friday, 20 March 2015

March equinox

There are two equinoxes every year – in March and September – when the Sun shines directly on the equator and the length of night and day are nearly equal.



On the equinox, night and day are nearly exactly the same length – 12 hours – all over the world. This is the reason it's called an “equinox”, derived from Latin, meaning "equal night"

The March equinox is also known as the "spring (vernal) equinox" in the northern hemisphere and as the "autumnal (fall) equinox" in the southern hemisphere.The March equinox has long been celebrated as a time of rebirth in the Northern Hemisphere. Many cultures celebrate spring festivals and holidays around the March equinox, like Easter and Passover.

But today will be freaky because the Earth will be under the influence of a solar eclipse and full moon, too. Watch this interesting video: